My Study Stuff

02/10/2017

Aspirine Use in Prevention

Filed under: Extra — anlactunay @ 8:00 AM

**Aspirin use in Prevention of CVD**
Recommends the use of aspirin for **men aged 45–79 years** when the potential benefit due to a reduction in myocardial infarctions outweighs the potential harm due to an increase in gastrointestinal hemorrhage. (A)
Recommends the use of aspirin for **women aged 55–79 years** when the potential benefit of a reduction in ischemic strokes outweighs the potential harm of an increase in gastrointestinal hemorrhage. (A)
Current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of aspirin for cardiovascular disease prevention in **men and women 80 years or older**. (I)
Recommends against the use of aspirin for stroke prevention in **women younger than 55 years** and for myocardial infarction prevention in **men younger than 45**. (D)

Recommendation A: The USPSTF strongly recommends that clinicians routinely provide the service to eligible patients. (The USPSTF found good evidence that the service improves important health outcomes and concludes that benefits substantially outweigh harms.)
Recommendation B: The USPSTF recommends that clinicians routinely provide the service to eligible patients. (The USPSTF found at least fair evidence that the service improves important health outcomes and concludes that benefits substantially outweigh harms.)
Recommendation C: The USPSTF makes no recommendation for or against routine provision of the service.
Recommendation D: The USPSTF recommends against routinely providing the service to asymptomatic patients. (The USPSTF found at least fair evidence that the service is ineffective or that harms outweigh benefits.)
Recommendation I: The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against routinely providing the service.
http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/BrowseRec/Index/browse-recommendations

Regular use of low-dose aspirin (81–325 mg) can reduce the incidence of myocardial infarction in men (see Chapter 10 – cmdt). Low-dose aspirin reduces incidence of stroke but not myocardial infarction in middle-aged women (see Chapter 24). Based on its ability to prevent cardiovascular events, aspirin use appears cost-effective for men and
women who are at increased cardiovascular risk, which can be defined as a 10-year risk over 10%. Results from a meta-analysis suggest that aspirin may also reduce the risk of
death from several common types of cancer (colorectal, esophageal, gastric, breast, prostate, and possibly lung).
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may reduce the incidence of colorectal adenomas and polyps but may also increase heart disease and gastrointestinal bleeding, and thus are not recommended for colon cancer prevention in average-risk patients.
Antioxidant vitamin (vitamin E, vitamin C, and beta-carotene) supplementation produced no significant reductions in the 5-year incidence of—or mortality from—vascular disease, cancer, or other major outcomes in high-risk individuals with coronary artery disease, other occlusive arterial disease, or diabetes mellitus.
cmdt
./. shortandsharp

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