My Study Stuff

03/12/2013

Reality & Truth

Filed under: Logic — anlactunay @ 8:32 AM

A collection of data is not information;
A collection of information is not knowledge;
A collection of knowledge is not wisdom;
A collection of wisdom is not truth.
http://profreynolds.wordpress.com/2011/01/31/the-data-information-hierarcy/
http://www.systems-thinking.org/kmgmt/kmgmt.htm
http://southernlibrarianship.icaap.org/content/v08n02/trivedi_m01.html

data==
pl.n. (used with a sing. or pl. verb)
1. Facts that can be analyzed or used in an effort to gain knowledge or make decisions; information.
2. Statistics or other information represented in a form suitable for processing by computer.
3. Plural of datum.

fact==
n.
1. Knowledge or information based on real occurrences: an account based on fact; a blur of fact and fancy.
2.
a. Something demonstrated to exist or known to have existed: Genetic engineering is now a fact. That Chaucer was a real person is an undisputed fact.
b. A real occurrence; an event: had to prove the facts of the case.
c. Something believed to be true or real: a document laced with mistaken facts.
3. A thing that has been done, especially a crime: an accessory before the fact.
4. [Law] A conclusion drawn by a judge or jury from the evidence in a case: a finding of fact.
Idiom:
in (point of) fact
In reality or in truth; actually.

information==
n.
1. Knowledge or facts learned, especially about a certain subject or event. See Synonyms at knowledge.
2. The act of informing or the condition of being informed; communication of knowledge: Safety instructions are provided for the information of our passengers.
3. [Computers] Processed, stored, or transmitted data.
4. A numerical measure of the uncertainty of an experimental outcome.
5. [Law] A formal accusation of a crime made by a public officer rather than by grand jury indictment in instances in which the offense, if a federal crime, is not a felony or in which the offense, if a state crime, is allowed prosecution in that manner rather than by indictment.

wisdom==
n.
1. The ability to discern or judge what is true, right, or lasting; insight.
2. Common sense; good judgment: “It is a characteristic of wisdom not to do desperate things” (Henry David Thoreau).
3.
a. The sum of learning through the ages; knowledge: “In those homely sayings was couched the collective wisdom of generations” (Maya Angelou).
b. Wise teachings of the ancient sages.
4. A wise outlook, plan, or course of action.
5. [Wisdom Bible] Wisdom of Solomon.

knowledge==
n.
1. The state or fact of knowing: Humans naturally aspire to knowledge.
2. Familiarity, awareness, or understanding gained through experience or study: has great knowledge of these parts; has only limited knowledge of chemistry.
3. The sum or range of what has been perceived, discovered, or learned: the extraordinary knowledge housed in the library.
4. [Archaic] Carnal knowledge.

Synonyms: knowledge, information, learning, erudition, scholarship, lore [1]
These nouns refer to what is known, as through study or experience. Knowledge is the broadest: “Science is organized knowledge” (Herbert Spencer).
Information often implies a collection of facts and data: “A man’s judgment cannot be better than the information on which he has based it” (Arthur Hays Sulzberger).
Learning usually refers to knowledge gained by schooling and study: “Learning … must be sought for with ardor and attended to with diligence” (Abigail Adams).
Erudition implies profound, often specialized knowledge: “Some have criticized his poetry as elitist, unnecessarily impervious to readers who do not share his erudition” (Elizabeth Kastor).
Scholarship is the mastery of a particular area of learning reflected in a scholar’s work: A good journal article shows ample evidence of the author’s scholarship.
Lore is usually applied to knowledge gained through tradition or anecdote about a particular subject: Many American folktales concern the lore of frontier life.

truth==
n. pl. truths (tr?thz, tr?ths)
1.
a. Conformity to fact or actuality: Does this story have any truth?
b. Reality; actuality: In truth, he was not qualified for the job.
c. The reality of a situation: The truth is, she respects your work.
2.
a. A statement proven to be or accepted as true: truths about nature.
b. Such statements considered as a group: researchers in pursuit of truth.
3. Sincerity; integrity: the truth of his intentions.
4. Fidelity to an original or standard: the truth of the copy.
5. Theology & Philosophy That which is considered to be the ultimate ground of reality.

Synonyms: truth, veracity, verity, verisimilitude
These nouns refer to the quality of being in accord with fact or reality. Truth is a comprehensive term that in all of its nuances implies accuracy and honesty: “We seek the truth, and will endure the consequences” (Charles Seymour).
Veracity is adherence to the truth: “Veracity is the heart of morality” (Thomas H. Huxley).
Verity often applies to an enduring or repeatedly demonstrated truth: “beliefs that were accepted as eternal verities” (James Harvey Robinson).
Verisimilitude is the quality of having the appearance of truth or reality: “merely corroborative detail, intended to give artistic verisimilitude to an otherwise bald and unconvincing narrative” (W.S. Gilbert).

reality==
n. pl. re·al·i·ties
1. The quality or state of being actual or true.
2. One, such as a person, an entity, or an event, that is actual: “the weight of history and political realities” (Benno C. Schmidt, Jr.)
3. The totality of all things possessing actuality, existence, or essence.
4. That which exists objectively and in fact: Your observations do not seem to be about reality.

adj.
Relating to or being a genre of television or film in which a storyline is created by editing footage of people interacting or competing with one another in unscripted, unrehearsed situations.

Idiom:
in reality
In fact; actually.
Source:
American Hearitage Dictionary
o0o

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