My Study Stuff

12/12/2011

semicolon

Filed under: Extra — anlactunay @ 8:14 AM

Use semicolon
1. between ITEMS IN A SERIES when some of the items already contain commas. [Rule #1]
2. between sentences that are CLOSELY CONNECTED IN IDEA.
3. before CONNECTORS
 connective adverbs such as HOWEVER, THEREFORE, NEVERTHELESS, MOREOVER, FURTHERMORE. CONSEQUENTLY, OTHERWISE, THUS
 transitional phrases such as FOR EXAMPLE, FOR INSTANCE, AS A RESULT, THAT IS, IN FACT, AS IN, etc.
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It is preferable to use a semicolon before INTRODUCTORY WORDS, CONNECTORS such as NAMELY, HOWEVER, THEREFORE, THAT IS, I.E., FOR EXAMPLE, E.G., or FOR INSTANCE when they introduce a complete sentence. It is also preferable to use a COMMA AFTER THE INTRODUCTORY WORD.
Examples:
// You will want to bring many backpacking items; FOR EXAMPLE, sleeping bags, pans, and warm clothing will make the trip better.

// As we discussed, you will bring two items; I.E., a sleeping bag and a tent are not optional.
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Use a colon instead of a semicolon or a period between two sentences when THE SECOND SENTENCE EXPLAINS OR ILLUSTRATES SOMETHING IN THE FIRST SENTENCE.
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+ Use a semicolon when you link two independent clauses with no connecting words. For example:
// He’s going home; he intends to stay there.
// It rained heavily during the afternoon; we managed to have our tennis match anyway.
// They couldnt make it to the summit and come hack before dark; they decided to camp for the night

+ You can also use a semicolon when you join two independent clauses together with one of the following conjunctive adverbs (adverbs that join independent clauses): however, moreover, therefore, consequently, otherwise, nevertheless, thus, etc. For example:
// He’s going home; moreover, he intends to stay there.
// It rained heavily during the afternoon; however, we managed to have our tennis match anyway.
// They couldnt make it to the summit and come hack before dark; therefore, they decided to camp for the night.

+ Semicolons are used to separate two equal and balanced parts of a sentence. They indicate that there is a connection between the two parts — a stronger connection than would be shown by a full stop.
// He brought me beautiful flowers; they were from a very exclusive florist.

+ While the comma is frequently used, the following are the general accepted rules for the use of the semicolon.
a) To separate two independent thoughts in a sentence that otherwise would have been separated by using a conjunction such as and or but.
Example:  
// It was the first of April; all the spring lines were on display.

* A comma separating these thoughts would not provide a distinct enough pause.
b) To precede the words “for example,” “for instance,” “as in,” etc. in sentences.
Example:  
// The course will include role-playing which demonstrates the practical application for anger management skills learned; for example, a boss employee conflict, a spousal argument, and a situation of a misbehaved child with a parent.  
c) To separate items in a long list, especially when commas have already been used.
Example:
// Please place the following orders with the restaurant for our breakfast meeting: two boiled eggs, sausages, toast, and coffee; eggs benedict with a side order of hash browns, tea and orange juice; and two pancakes with one egg cooked over easy and coffee.

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